Tag: Education/Post-Secondary

The Hidden Barriers of Proprietary Software (ERP) and the Employment of the Visually Impaired

Many companies and universities have moved to ERP or Proprietary software. Almost all of these have varying barriers when it comes to Assistive Technology such as screen readers. Many are completely inaccessible. In this presentation we will discuss the different barriers those with visual impairments face and why. We will also discuss possible solutions to these barriers.

Key Learning Outcomes

1. What is ERP/Proprietary software and how is it used in companies and universities?
2. Why are there barriers with ERP/Proprietary software when it comes to assistive technology such as screen readers?
3. What can be done to overcome these barriers for the visually impaired?

Presentation Materials

AT Assessments: Providing the Best Technology Solutions to Elementary and Secondary Students

The best assistive technology decisions for elementary- and secondary-age students with visual impairments are made when students, parents, teachers, and administrators are empowered by 1) knowing what resources are available, 2) what technology devices are most appropriate for each student’s classroom and recreational use, and 3) how to individualize the student’s technology instruction program for optimal success and independence. This discussion will provide an overview of the technology assessment process, how to select the right technology tools, the roles of assessment and instructional team members in providing effective educational services, and how to promote student independence through competent and confident application of technology devices, solutions, and strategies.

Key Learning Outcomes

1. Participants will learn about three resources that can help them to locate information about what technology solutions and devices are available, and how to use the information these resources provide.

2. Participants will identify three major components of a technology assessment and why each is vital to a student’s technology program development.

3. Participants will discuss five ways to effectively individualize a student’s technology program by applying the use of resources and competent technology assessment.

Incorporating Access and Sensory Strategies Transparently into Multiple Environments

In our post-pandemic educational, therapeutic, and workplace environments, levels of anxiety have created issues surrounding both access to and the ability to complete tasks. In dealing with individuals, professionals have sought to provide sensory relief and then return those individuals to the tasks at hand. In reality, a combination of sensory support and alternative approaches to AT usage can allow individuals to create self-regulating habits as well as increasing their own cognitive and workplace abilities. This session looks at providing levels of transparency with both AT and Sensory Supports within any environment to assist in this process. In a hands-on format, we will review ways of approach in both Access through AT and self-regulation through socially and environmentally appropriate manners providing ideas for these environments.

Key Learning Outcomes

1. Participants will identify strategies to create transparency with AT
2. Participants will interact with various sensory strategies which provide support for all individuals.
3. Participants will design a foundation for the movement into transparency with both AT and Sensory Supports

A Hype-free Discussion of Generative AI (Pt 2): Brainstorming Applications, Issues, and Best Practices

In Part 2 of this double session on generative AI (and specifically ChatGPT), AT consultant Shelley Haven will leaded a guided interactive discussion to brainstorm various ideas and issues:

–Propose applications for generative AI to enhance teaching and learning
–Identify significant issues that impact using generative AI in education
–Suggest best practices that encourage responsible and ethical use.

The implications for generative AI in education are simultaneously exciting and concerning. We are likely at an inflection point similar to 20 years ago when education began integrating the Internet, and 40 years ago when schools started employing desktop computers. Consider this discussion as a beginning – the information, insights, and ideas gained will help you continue the discussion about AI in your school, district, or practice.

Learning Outcomes

1.  Understanding AI: Explain why “generative AI” like ChatGPT is unique and ground-breaking and how to get effective results when using it.

2.  Uses for AI: Name at least three novel applications of generative AI like ChatGPT in education (both teaching and learning).

3.  Best practices for AI: Name at least three strategies for harnessing generative AI in education while addressing concerns such as cheating, plagiarism, privacy, and ethical use.

Note: these learning outcomes apply to the combination of both Part 1 and Part 2 of this double session.

Helping You and Your Students Achieve Your Goals through UDL (Part 2)

Part 1 of a two sessions focused on universal design for learning. Universal design for learning (UDL) is a framework based on neuroscience that is intended to foster the development of learners who are purposeful and motivated, knowledgeable and resourceful, and strategic and goal directed. Further, understanding the relationship among learning goals, assessment, methods and materials, and applying the UDL framework with fidelity is central to supporting effective learners and learning.

This session will provide participants with an overview of the underlying tenets and guidelines of UDL, a  rationale for its implementation in P-20 education, a discussion of common critiques, and an opportunity to apply the principles to hypothetical and actual learning contexts.

Key Learning Outcomes

1. Participants will develop or refine their understanding of the three principles and nine guidelines of the UDL framework.
2. Participants will identify strengths and challenges to the effective implementation of the UDL framework within their professional context.
3. Participants will apply select guidelines of the UDL framework within a hypothetical and/or actual learning context.

A Hype-free Discussion of Generative AI (Pt 1): What It Is, How It Works, Opportunities, and Challenges

Artificial Intelligence, or AI, has been part of our daily lives for decades (think speech recognition, Netflix recommendations, contextual grammar checkers, and GPS navigation).  The recent hype – and angst – about AI in education centers on so-called “generative AI” such as ChatGPT that can create novel content and both understands and responds using conversational language.  As this emergent technology raises more questions than it answers, educators should understand how to harness its capabilities and make sound decisions about its use.

In Part 1 of this informative and thought-provoking double session, AT consultant Shelley Haven will explain:

–What artificial intelligence is (and isn’t)
–What makes ChatGPT unique and ground-breaking
–How ChatGPT can support teaching and learning
–Challenges that must be addressed to ensure responsible use.

Key Learning Outcomes

1.  Understanding AI: Explain why “generative AI” like ChatGPT is unique and ground-breaking and how to get effective results when using it.
2.  Uses for AI: Name at least three novel applications of generative AI like ChatGPT in education (both teaching and learning)
3.  Best practices for AI: Name at least three strategies for harnessing generative AI in education while addressing concerns such as cheating, plagiarism, privacy, and ethical use.

Note: these learning outcomes apply to the combination of both Part 1 and Part 2 of this double session.

Helping You and Your Students Achieve Your Goals through UDL (Part 1)

Part 1 of a two sessions focused on universal design for learning. Universal design for learning (UDL) is a framework based on neuroscience that is intended to foster the development of learners who are purposeful and motivated, knowledgeable and resourceful, and strategic and goal directed. Further, understanding the relationship among learning goals, assessment, methods and materials, and applying the UDL framework with fidelity is central to supporting effective learners and learning.

This session will provide participants with an overview of the underlying tenets and guidelines of UDL, a  rationale for its implementation in P-20 education, a discussion of common critiques, and an opportunity to apply the principles to hypothetical and actual learning contexts.

Key Learning Outcomes

1. Participants will develop or refine their understanding of the three principles and nine guidelines of the UDL framework.
2. Participants will identify strengths and challenges to the effective implementation of the UDL framework within their professional context.
3. Participants will apply select guidelines of the UDL framework within a hypothetical and/or actual learning context.

Setting the Bar High in College: A Student Panel

Individuals with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities may decide to attend college for many reasons. However, abundant research has shown these individuals are frequently not given the level of support needed for college transition. Students with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities do earn meaningful college credentials when given enough support, which can lead to integrated career opportunities. “Setting the bar high”, or supporting the development of organizational, time management, and goal setting skills, can greatly improve outcomes for these college students. Attendees of this presentation will hear the voices of college students with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities who attend college in Northern Arizona. Students will share their insights regarding success in higher education and describe how “setting the bar high” has enabled them to reach their goals.

Key Learning Outcomes

1. Participants will understand the SIP-C program, its mission, its distinct zones across Northern Arizona, and the support services provided to students in each zone.
2. Participants will recognize the unique experiences of students with I/DD navigating college transition, including the barriers they face and their personal successes, to increase awareness and visibility of disability voices in higher education institutions
3. Participants will identify the benefits of post-secondary transition for students with I/DD, specifically in their development of self-advocacy, self-determination, autonomy, and independent living skills

Presentation Materials

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